Tag: eBooks

The Cost of Self Publishing 2016

The great folks over at Reedsy.com have answered the question, How Much Does it Cost to Self-Publish an eBook.

The costs are based on data culled from the Reedsy marketplace. You may find other prices elsewhere but for a good measuring stick their info graphic is a wonderful tool. One thing to bear in mind is that while you can spend more than is here and you can spend less, the important thing is that in an already crowded marketplace for your book to stand out you will need to spend some money. Now you know about how much.

My Latest Book Is Available Now

The Hole in Your MindMy Collection of short stories, The Hole In Your Mind, is available in paperback and as an eBook on Amazon.com. I’ve been working on it for awhile and some of the stories I’ve had since I began writing. The short flash fiction parts were all exercises at the West Valley Writers’ Workshop, but were interesting enough I had to include them between the stories. The paperback sells for $12.99 and the Kindle version goes for $3.99. I will have information on other retailers soon.

The Day I Deleted My Kindle App

kindleThe Amazon Kindle App was one of the first additions to my smartphone back in 2010. Today I removed it from my current phone. It has been replaced by my shiny new Kindle Paperwhite. For the longest time I was a strong proponent of having everything on my mobile device; all my books, music, streaming, games, you name it. The convenience of having a single device that can do everything is great, but sometimes a device that does one thing really well is the better choice. The Kindle Paperwhite is the e-Reader I have been waiting for. (Though no offense to all the Nook owners out there. They are great devices too, I just have 90% of my library in Amazon’s cloud.)

One problem with reading on a smartphone, or tablet for that matter, is that bright screen will eat up most of your device’s battery life. One look at the battery usage and you’ll see that the screen accounts for most of the use on any given day. An hour or more of reading could really have you hunting for your charging cable, especially as your device ages, to say nothing of the strain on your eyes. The e-ink screen on the Kindle, (or Nook GlowLight), is far easier on the eyes, even with the back-light on, plus it merely sips at the battery. There are a number of font types and sizes and the pages snap into view quickly. The size and weight make it perfect for one handed reading. It is even lighter than my smartphone. Storage is not a problem as eBooks take up so little space and with WiFi connected to the cloud my whole Kindle library is available at a touch.

There are 4 models of Kindles plus ones with special offers that reduce the cost so I urge you to take a look. Once I began using mine I had no problem removing the app from my mobile devices. Besides, I needed the space for more matching gem games.

War of the Word

ebooks on deviceLibraries are in the midst of their own version of the War of the Roses as they try to adapt to their patrons needs and juggle print and digital resources. It is a costly and time consuming endeavor but one whose importance shouldn’t be understated.

On one side is the trusted book. Our minds are imprinted with the book from our earliest stages of learning, remember, “A is for apple, B is for book.” We know what it feels like, what the pages smell like, and the sound the binding makes when you crack it open. Books are ubiquitous now where once they were the privilege of the wealthy. What a sign of wealth it was to have a library of your own. Books can be heavy and it is challenging to store a lot of them.

Digital content covers everything from online magazines, video, music, photos and of course eBooks. You can pile whole libraries of this content into your smartphone, tablet, or reader. The catch is you need a device. Where a book only required your eyes, (or finger), eBooks, as all digital content, need a device to be read from. One you must purchase or lease. Speaking of which, you don’t technically own eBooks. You license them like a piece of software. Publishers have finally come up with a way to thwart libraries lending of books for free. Hence eBooks will always be a more costly solution and present unique challenges for the library patron.

Right now the smart money is on eBooks. New technology always replaces old. Just don’t tell that to the vinyl record. So books offer simplicity and zero barriers for entry. eBooks offer convenience and portability, so long as your device holds up. So you can see, declaring one over the other is not so easy. Going all digital does not solve the problems of managing a modern library’s collection, nor does clinging to print books.

Currently libraries lease most of their digital resources as a stop gap to give their patrons what they want. This works for now but really does not present much of a future for the library. As prices for this content rise and more of their budgets get syphoned off libraries will find little to nothing to show for all the money they invested in their digital collections, to say nothing of products that no longer get support or disappear from the marketplace. For libraries to have any future they must secure digital content that they own. After all you cannot build a collection of purchase orders and license agreements.

An Idea So Crazy It Just Might Work

long bookIt still scares the bejeeses out of me. That idea is,  What If Authors Were Paid Every Time Someone Turned a Page? I placed my book Undead Heart on Kindle Select over a year ago. I have not seen much revenue from borrows, less than sales in truth. SO it was with mild interest I read the email last month from Amazon announcing their shift to a pay-per-page plan. Then this week I read this article on Gizmodo Amazon Might Pay Self-published Authors Less Than a Cent  Natually I had to do some math. Under the old plan if someone borrowed a copy of Undead Heart I received $9.99. The length of the book is 230 pages so at 0.006/page that comes out to $1.38. Now that is most likely a worse case scenario, (please be a worse case). Either way I am keeping my day job for as long as the State Library stays open.

One thought that troubles me, now,  is how writers will adapt to this market. I do not write long books. My books are the length I need to tell the story and my stories are usually pretty concise. I’ve talked to new writers who complain about 100,00 pages just not being enough to tell their epic fantasy opera. In the back of my mind I’m also thinking it is probably more than most would care to read anyway. Just the same, the precedent here rewards for length but not necessarily quality. Granted a reader has to stay invested in the story to keep reading, and nothing sends a reader screaming for the exit like crappy writing,  but there are enough tricks and traps to keep the reader flipping to find out what happens next. Will we now be subject to 500 plus page tomes that amount to the literary equivalent of a pop-up book? I wish I knew,  then maybe I would get started on one. What do you think? Does pay-by-page entice you to try Kindle Select?

This Kind of Cheesed Me Off

Wired magazine has started a new feature that pokes fun at self-published eBooks. Introducing Our Reviews of Absurd Self-published e-Books I am not sure if I should hail it as a great service to us as independent authors or be offended. The latter seems closer to me. In truth there are far too many books that should have remained locked in their author’s subconscious. For some reason these authors had the courage and the dedication to bring these works to light and I commend them. I just wished they had listened to those of us who stress the importance of editing and rewriting.

My main problem is this. Can independent authors ever escape the stigma of being the farm league of the big five publishers while putting out stuff that is so ripe for mocking? If something like the attention given to them by Wired and sites like Kindle Cover Disasters helps further developing authors along, or at the very least, avoid some of these missteps then I can see it as a good. If instead it becomes a race to write the worst book just for the 15 seconds of fame from a mention in Wired, then independents only have themselves to blame for not being taken seriously.

Self-E

self e platform

I submitted my second novel, In The Presence of Gods, to SELF-e, a unique curated collection of e-books for libraries. SELF-e is a project by Library Journal magazine and Bibliolabs, a provider of digital repositories. I have been working with my co-workers at the Arizona State library to launch the e-book platform, Reading Arizona. A logical extension of that platform is to offer independent authors a place to offer their works to the borrowing public. Arizona is teaming up with Bibliolabs to do just that through SELF-e.

Independent authors know that some channels remain out of reach. The idea behind SELF-e is that libraries shouldn’t be one. The process of submitting is simple and easy to understand. Once your work is submitted it will be read by one of two editors who will then decide if it meets the level of content and quality they are looking for. If selected, the work will be added to the national collection. Even if not selected, the work will be sent on to the partner library in the state that author registers in. These works could then be added to the state’s local collection.

Right now there is no method for author compensation. The real draw for the author is the exposure to a new and wider audience. The draw for libraries is participating in a program that offers materials for all their patrons with e-readers. I, for one, am excited to see where this platform can go from here.

Self Published Works Gain Ground

A recent article appeared on the web the other day from Small Business Trends31 Percent of Daily E-Book Sales Are Now by Self-Published Authors. These numbers are taken from the sales reports captured by Authors’ Earnings based on daily sales at Amazon.com. The interesting trend is how the sales have increased over the last few months when they accounted for 27%. Now the Big-5 publishers still account for the majority of sales at 38% but it does not take much mathematics to see that if the trend continues self-published authors will over take them.

I basically take away 2 things from this article. One, readers are hungry for cheap e-Books and are willing to look outside the familiar names in publishing. Two, there is no better time to be a self-published author. There is an audience out there waiting for our works and they are spending. That does not mean the path to riches has been greased or is all downhill. Whatever measure for success one chooses an author is still going to have to cover a lot of ground to achieve it. At least now the barriers for entry to this path are not so formidable, or dare I say, closed off.